martes, 29 de octubre de 2013

Notorious Nazi Erich Priebke causes uproar even in death


The death of a notorious Nazi war criminal from World War II has ignited a new battle in Italy over where and how he can be buried.

The uproar over Erich Priebke, who died On Friday at the age of 100, comes as the country is about to mark Holocaust Remembrance Day in Italy on Wednesday. This year, the date will mark the 70th anniversary of the deportation of Roman Jews in 1943, many of whom died in Nazi concentration camps.

Priebke was an unrepentant SS officer who spent 50 years after the war living openly in Argentina until ABC NEW's Sam Donaldson tracked him down on the street of the town of Bariloche in 1994 and asked him about the massacre of 335 Italian civilians, including 57 Jews, in 1944 at the Ardeatine Caves in Rome.

Priebke's casual admittance to taking part in the slaughter -- retaliation for the killing of 33 German soldiers -- and dismissal of his responsibilities caused shock and an indignant response around the world. He was extradited to Italy soon afterwards.

He was sentenced to life imprisonment in 1998 by an Italian military court, but allowed to serve the last 17 years under house arrest.


Priebke continues to incite anger and protests even in death. Anti and pro-Priebke graffiti has appeared in Rome as the debate rages here as to what to do about his funeral and where he should be buried. The tenor rose when his lawyer released a video and a seven page written message Priebke had left as "testament" in which he denied the Holocaust and the Nazi gas chambers and again showed no remorse for his actions.

The Rome Vicariate, which overseas churches in the city and province, promptly announced in a statement soon after his death that no public funeral would be granted to him in the city or outskirts of Rome. Officials cited canon law which states that a funeral may be denied to "manifest sinners who cannot be granted ecclesiastical funerals without public scandal of the faithful."

The chief of police, Fulvio Della Rocca, said that no public funeral nor public funeral procession would be allowed for reasons of public order.

The Rome vicariate later announced a "private and discreet" ceremony will be held in a "place that does not disturb anyone" so as to "allow relatives to gather for a moment of prayer."

Priebke's lawyer released statements saying that "a large part of the Italian people are concerned that religious rites be refused to a dead person" and said he would hold the funeral in the street if no church would allow the funeral.

"Priebke", he said "received confession regularly and was absolved by the clergy."

Even if a funeral is settled, Priebke's burial is not settled.

Argentina, his home for 50 years after the war, has said they do not want him. His birthplace outside of Berlin, Hennigsdord, say there is no room for him in the cemetery. Rome's Mayor Ignazio Marino said it would be an offense to Romans if he were buried in a Roman cemetery.

Some have suggested he could be buried at the German military cemetery in Pomezia, south of Rome, but the town's mayor quickly ruled this out.

"The Pomezia German cemetery is only for Germans who died in the war. Criminals from the Nazi regime are an indelible mark of our history, and those who committed such crimes must be tried and then cancelled from our collective memory. Pomezia will never accept any of them," the mayor said.

Priebke's son, Jorge, who still lives in Argentina, is quoted in the Italian media saying what happened to his father "an injustice" and said that "the trial against my father was all invented by the Jews." He will not attend the funeral wherever they take place. "Apart from the fact that I have health problems, we do not have the money for a ticket. I receive a minimum pension in Argentina, " he said.

---------

Erich Preibke, the convicted Nazi SS officer who died in Rome on Friday October 11 at the age of a hundred,

Preibke continues to incite anger and protests even in death. Anti and pro-Priebke graffiti has appeared in Rome as the debate rages here as to what to do about his funeral and where he should be buried.

Priebke's name alone causes outrage among many in Rome where descendants of the 335 Italian civilians including 57 Jews who were massacred in 1944 at the Ardeatine Caves in Rome still remember that tragic period vividly.


He was sentenced to life imprisonment in 1998 by an Italian military court for planning the mass execution in a furious reprisal for an attack by anti-fascist resistance forces in the center of Rome the day before which killed 33 German soldiers. Priebke admitted to helping draw up the list of victims, shooting two of the prisoners and overseeing the deaths of the others. During and since the trial, Priebke never expressed public remorse, insisting that he was following orders during wartime.

For 50 years since 1949 he had been living a tranquil life with his family in Argentina until ABC NEW's Sam Donaldson tracked him down on the street of the town of Bariloche and asked him about the massacre in 1994. His casual admittance to taking part in it and dismissal of his responsibilities caused shock and an indignant response around the world. He was extradited to Italy soon afterwards.

He had been living in his lawyer's apartment in Rome for the last 17 years ever since the Rome courts granted him house arrest.

After his death, his lawyer released the video and 7-page written message Priebke had left as "testament" in which he denied the Holocaust and the Nazi gas chambers and again showed no remorse for his actions.

----------- 

 The death of a notorious Nazi war criminal from World War II has ignited a new battle in Italy over where and how he can be buried.

The uproar over Erich Priebke, who died On Friday at the age of 100, comes as the country is about to mark Holocaust Remembrance Day in Italy on Wednesday. This year, the date will mark the 70th anniversary of the deportation of Roman Jews in 1943, many of whom died in Nazi concentration camps.

Priebke was an unrepentant SS officer who spent 50 years after the war living openly in Argentina until ABC NEW's Sam Donaldson tracked him down on the street of the town of Bariloche in 1994 and asked him about the massacre of 335 Italian civilians, including 57 Jews, in 1944 at the Ardeatine Caves in Rome.

Priebke's casual admittance to taking part in the slaughter -- retaliation for the killing of 33 German soldiers -- and dismissal of his responsibilities caused shock and an indignant response around the world. He was extradited to Italy soon afterwards.

He was sentenced to life imprisonment in 1998 by an Italian military court, but allowed to serve the last 17 years under house arrest.

Priebke continues to incite anger and protests even in death. Anti and pro-Priebke graffiti has appeared in Rome as the debate rages here as to what to do about his funeral and where he should be buried. The tenor rose when his lawyer released a video and a seven page written message Priebke had left as "testament" in which he denied the Holocaust and the Nazi gas chambers and again showed no remorse for his actions.

The Rome Vicariate, which overseas churches in the city and province, promptly announced in a statement soon after his death that no public funeral would be granted to him in the city or outskirts of Rome. Officials cited canon law which states that a funeral may be denied to "manifest sinners who cannot be granted ecclesiastical funerals without public scandal of the faithful."

The chief of police, Fulvio Della Rocca, said that no public funeral nor public funeral procession would be allowed for reasons of public order.

The Rome vicariate later announced a "private and discreet" ceremony will be held in a "place that does not disturb anyone" so as to "allow relatives to gather for a moment of prayer."


Priebke's lawyer released statements saying that "a large part of the Italian people are concerned that religious rites be refused to a dead person" and said he would hold the funeral in the street if no church would allow the funeral.

"Priebke", he said "received confession regularly and was absolved by the clergy."

Even if a funeral is settled, Priebke's burial is not settled.


Source: http://www.whas11.com/news/Notorious-Nazi-Erich-Priebke-causes-uproar-even-in-death-227795571.html


Tres señores de la muerte y dos ángeles del infierno

Sadismo, crueldad, y, sobre todo, una frialdad imposible de entender. Sin duda, estos son los atributos que asaltan la mente cuando se piensa en los soldados que, a las órdenes de Hitler, jugaron con la vida de cientos de miles de personas durante la II Guerra Mundial. Sin embargo, se quedan cortos a la hora de definir a insignes nazis como Amon Göth –un capitán de las SS que practicaba puntería a diario con los prisioneros del campo de concentración que dirigía- o Ilse Koch –acusada de fabricar lámparas con la piel de decenas de judíos-. Si algo ha demostrado la Historia, es que la brutalidad del ser humano puede ser infinita.
A lo largo del tiempo se han ido diluyendo los crueles actos de infamia protagonizados por varios de estos alemanes que, sintiéndose privilegiados por portar la calavera de las SS, daban rienda suelta a sus más sádicas fantasías. Son en los campos de concentración en los que la vida de un prisionero valía menos que la de un animal de compañía, y en donde, por muy extraño que parezca, la muerte no era el peor de los destinos. Y es que en estos recintos acechaban desde temibles seres enfundados en uniformes que gozaban torturando durante semanas -y hasta el último aliento de vida- a los cautivos hasta, incluso, extravagantes doctores nazis que practicaban inconcebibles y mortales experimentos en personas vivas.

Tres señores de la muerte


Uno de los señores de la muerte es Amon Göth, el popular comandante del campo de concentración de Plaszow (ubicado en Polonia) que fue retratado por Spielberg en la película «La lista de Schindler». Este cruel oficial vino al mundo en 1.908 y, con apenas 23 años –tan sólo 5 después de unirse a los nazis- se convirtió en miembro de las SS.
Göth no tuvo que esperar mucho para poder demostrar su crueldad, de hecho, una de sus primeras oportunidades le llegó cuando tenía poco más de treinta años y recibió la orden de destruir el barrio judío que los alemanes habían creado en Cracovia. Así, corría 1.943 cuando acabó en plena calle, y junto a sus hombres, con la vida de más de 2.000 personas en tan sólo dos días y envió a campos de concentración y exterminio a otras 10.000.
Pero por lo que se haría desgraciadamente famoso este nazi sería por dirigir con puño de hierro el campo de concentración de Plaszow durante más de dos años. Ese breve periodo de tiempo le valió para ganarse el apodo de «El verdugo» pues, entre otras cosas, gozaba golpeando a mujeres hasta la muerte o asesinando, al azar, a diferentes reos sólo por diversión. A su vez, consiguió que su nombre quedara rubricado en las páginas de la Historia por practicar puntería con un rifle de francotirador indiscriminadamente sobre los cautivos del lugar.
El segundo señor de la muerte es Oskar Dirlewanger, el conocido con el sobrenombre del «Verdugo de Varsovia». «Nacido en la ciudad bávara de Wurzburgo en 1895, luchó en la Primera Guerra Mundial, siendo herido y condecorado. Tras la guerra, Dirlewanger se doctoró en Ciencias Políticas y en 1923 se afilió al partido nazi. Aunque trabajaba como maestro, su vida era muy desordenada; dado a la bebida y a los escándalos públicos, acabó condenado por violar a una menor en 1934, reincidiendo en cuanto salió en libertad. Sus contactos en las SS le rescataron y fue enviado a España, a luchar en la Legión Cóndor. En 1939 alcanzó una posición destacada en las SS, lo que le permitió continuar impunemente con sus tropelías».
«En 1940 se le encargó la creación de un batallón formado por cazadores furtivos convictos. La unidad acabó aceptando delincuentes acusados de delitos graves. En 1941 fue empleada en Rusia para luchar contra los partisanos, en donde sus miembros pudieron dar rienda suelta a sus impulsos criminales. El batallón fue enviado a la región de la ciudad polaca de Lublin, convirtiéndola en escenario de saqueos, incendios, asesinatos, violaciones y atrocidades sin límite. Los hombres de Dirlewanger también serían empleados en la represión del levantamiento de Varsovia en 1944, cometiendo aún mayores excesos, como la irrupción en un hospital en donde los pacientes fueron acribillados en sus camas y las enfermeras violadas y asesinadas. Al acabar la guerra, Dirlewanger fue capturado por los franceses, quienes lo entregaron a unos soldados polacos para que se tomasen cumplida venganza. Al parecer, éstos le torturaron durante varios días, acabando con su vida en torno al 4 de junio de 1945», sentencia el experto.
Y el tercero, es al sanguinario Josef Mengele, un cruel doctor nazi cuyos sádicos experimentos le convirtieron en el terror de los prisioneros del campo de concentración de Auschwitz. Este médico solía asesinar a parejas de gemelos de corta edad creyendo que, mediante sus cuerpos, podría descubrir el secreto de la clonación humana.  Dichos experimentos le pusieron en los más altos escalafones de el aparato nazi. A pesar de todo, Mengele no llegó a pagar por sus crímenes, su rastro se pierde tras el final de la guerra y nunca pudo ser capturado. Su historia se empieza a conocer gracias al diario de Anna Frank.

Dos ángeles del infierno


Sin embargo, la crueldad desmesurada que se ejercía contra los presos en los campos de concentración nazis no fue, ni mucho menos, una práctica exclusiva del género masculino. Así, es imposible no estremecerse ante los actos realizados por personajes como la bella Ilse Köhler (llamada la «Zorra de Buchenwald»).
Esta alemana llegó al mundo en 1.906 y, a una corta edad, quedó fascinada ante los hombres uniformados de las SS, por lo que no dudó en solicitar el carnet del NSDAP. De cabellos pelirrojos, ojos verdes y una extrema sensualidad, Ilse contrajo matrimonio a los 31 años con Karl Koch, comandante del, en ese momento, recién construido campo de concentración de Buchenwald. Por ello, la feliz pareja decidió, como era habitual, habitar una de las casas cercanas a la prisión.
Una vez en el campo de concentración, Ilse gozaba dando largos paseos a lomos de su caballo y exhibiendo su sensualidad ante los presos. Sin embargo, no dudaba en acabar cruelmente con la vida de aquellos que alzaran la vista para mirarla. A su vez, fue acusada de asesinar y despellejar los cadáveres de cientos de presos para fabricar objetos cotidianos como libretas o pantallas para lámparas.
Con todo, la «Zorra de Buchenwald» no era el único ángel de la muerte que rondaba los campos teñidos con la sangre de los presos. «En el libro también explico la vida de Irma Grese, la “Bella Bestia”. Nacida en 1923, su infancia feliz se vio truncada por el suicidio de su madre y el distanciamiento con su padre. Tras abandonar los estudios, y trabajar en una granja y en una tienda, fue enfermera en un hospital de las SS, en donde se vio imbuida de la ideología nazi. De ahí pasó al campo de concentración de Ravensbrück como guardiana, siendo destinada después a Auschwitz-Birkenau». 
«Pese a su juventud, apenas 20 años, acumuló poder rápidamente, teniendo a su cargo más de treinta mil prisioneras. Con ellas cometería todo tipo de excesos, combinando violencia y un erotismo perverso. A las más jóvenes las azotaba en los pechos hasta descarnarlos, o bien las convertía en amantes suyas para enviarlas después a la cámara de gas. A las embarazadas les ataba las piernas juntas en el parto y asistía a su muerte, visiblemente excitada», destaca el autor.
Finalmente, las sanguinarias prácticas de Irma se encontraron con la justicia aliada una vez acabada la II Guerra Mundial. «En 1945 regresó a Ravensbrück y de ahí pasó al campo de Bergen-Belsen, siendo capturada por los británicos. Fue sometida a juicio, en donde se mostró como una nazi fanática. Su atractivo físico, que contrastaba con la fealdad de las otras guardianas acusadas, le llevó a ser bautizada por la prensa sensacionalista como la “Bella Bestia”. Grese eludió cualquier responsabilidad en los crímenes de los que se la acusaba y aseguró que se había limitado a cumplir con su obligación. Fue sentenciada a muerte y ejecutada en la horca el 13 de diciembre de 1945. Sus últimas palabras al verdugo fueron Schnell! (¡Rápido!)».
Fuente: http://www.abc.es/historia-militar/20131029/abci-bestias-nazis-libro-201310281217.html

viernes, 18 de octubre de 2013

EL HORROR DESCONOCIDO


Marta Merajver-Kurlat, profesora de Lengua y Literatura Inglesa, Escritora, Traductora y Psicoanalista argentina nos obsequia con un relato personal que nos abre nuevas visiones de diferentes realidades dentro de una misma Realidad. El relato está cargado de mucha emotividad, cariño e interrogantes; ¡no todo está dicho! Desde aquí, Marta, mi agradecimiento por esta tan valiosa intervención, que espero que sea la primera de otras muchas.


EL HORROR DESCONOCIDO

La conocí en la Universidad de Londres, hace ya muchos años. Lo primero que llamó mi atención fue su edad, muy por encima de la del resto de mis compañeros en aquella clase de literatura del siglo XIX. Luego, su marcado acento alemán, rebelde a sus intentos por disimularlo. También su retraimiento de todo contacto con nosotros, pero muy especialmente un detalle de su vestimenta que, en mi atolondrada juventud, atribuí a un capricho excéntrico, a una paradoja mediante la cual llamaba la atención al tiempo que intentaba pasar lo más desapercibida posible. Hablo de un foulard que cubría su cuello desde el mentón hasta las clavículas, sin importar la temperatura.

Éramos compañeras de banco. Me molestaba sobremanera que Margot –así se llamaba– no levantara la vista de sus papeles y libros sino para mirar el pizarrón, como si sus músculos no le permitieran un desplazamiento lateral de la mirada. Me irritaban sus respuestas monosilábicas a mi curiosidad natural, puesto que el reducido número de extranjeros admitido en la carrera de Letras había conformado un grupo compacto para intentar un remedo de hogar lejos del hogar.

Transcurrieron muchos meses antes de que Margot me dirigiera espontáneamente la palabra, y cuando lo hizo, fue por desesperación, porque necesitaba la clave para comprender un texto que a mí me resultaba sencillo y a ella le sonaba a imposible. La ayudé sin dar mayor importancia al asunto, y eso, supongo, abrió una compuerta de comunicación que alenté, un poco por paliar ese aislamiento que ella había impuesto desde el principio y que había sido retribuido con la misma moneda, y otro poco por curiosidad, una curiosidad que intuía algún secreto que mi simiente de escritora, ya entonces, olfateaba interesante y romántico. Es increíble lo estúpida que puede ser una casi adolescente llena de ínfulas y falta de experiencia…

Margot aprendió a confiar en mí, y no la defraudé. Habló de su infancia, de su madre, de su pasión por la literatura, postergada hasta ese momento. Yo escuchaba en silencio. Necesitaba que llegara el momento preciso de preguntar acerca del foulard, que a esta altura, porque no había mencionado amores, se había convertido en mi imaginación en una prenda de amor, remembranza de algún abandono, o quizá de una muerte. Pero ella no hacía referencia a hombre alguno, y la impaciencia ganó la batalla.

-Margot- le pregunté un día, tomando un té a unas cuadras de la facultad -¿por qué no te quitas nunca el pañuelo? ¿Quién te lo dio?

Ella se levantó de golpe, clavando sus ojillos redondos y marrones en los míos.

-Mocosa impertinente- me increpó. -¡Cómo me equivoque contigo!-y partió, dejándome atontada y remordida. Que se entienda: remordida por no haber sabido esperar. Nunca se me ocurrió que le estuviera causando daño.

Luego se las compuso para encontrar un lugar en el fondo del aula. Pasaba a mi lado como si yo fuera invisible, y por cierto, lo era. Ella no quería verme.

Nos separaron los cursos y las materias, y podría decirse que la olvidé. A lo sumo, cuando dejaba la mente en blanco, la pregunta por el foulard se deslizaba hacia mi conciencia por un breve instante para luego volver a perderse en el magma de los pasados inconclusos.

La volví a encontrar después de graduada, en la sala de profesores asistentes. No había cambiado un ápice; yo sí. Había madurado, y sentí que le debía una disculpa. Me recibió mejor de lo que esperaba.
-No es tu culpa-dijo. –Si todavía podemos ser amigas, te invito a cenar a mi casa.

Por supuesto, acepté. Margot ocupaba un cuarto en una pensión, donde le habían permitido instalar un pequeño anafe para no compartir las comidas con los demás huéspedes. Había preparado un refrigerio sencillo y apetitoso y, hasta cierto punto, la encontré más desenvuelta que antes. Después del postre, mientras retiraba el servicio sin permitirme ayudarla, dijo, de espaldas a mí:

-Tú querías saber algo.

Era verdad, pero no me habría atrevido a tocar el tema que tanto la había molestado. Me limité a esperar. Ella se volvió, y con una sola mano retiró el foulard de su cuello y se desabotonó la camisa. Ante mis ojos atónitos se destacaban largas cicatrices de cortes profundos que le cruzaban la parte superior del cuerpo y se perdían bajo los pantalones.

-Allá en mi país, Alemania, yo era enfermera. Durante la guerra me destinaron a un campo. Los pacientes eran soldados que necesitaban vacunas, desinfectantes, pavadas, bah… Teníamos prohibido ingresar al área de los prisioneros. Sin embargo, yo tenía enorme curiosidad por ver de cerca esas sombras escuálidas que se desdibujaban a bastante distancia del hospital. Un día escapé hacia las barracas, y se me partió el alma. Te aclaro que, como la mayoría de mis compatriotas, nunca había pensado demasiado en el régimen. La propaganda culpaba de todos nuestros males a los judíos, gente que no se mezclaba con nosotros sino ocasionalmente, gente que no podíamos reconocer entre los otros. Ni los odiábamos ni los queríamos; nos eran totalmente indiferentes. Pero esa noche caí en la cuenta de padecimientos innombrables, y de que no sólo se trataba de judíos, sino de homosexuales, enemigos políticos, gitanos… Empecé a robar –sí, a robar– medicamentos, algodón, comida, que se tiraba, y mucha, para expiar la vergüenza que sentía. Tenía mucho miedo también, aunque la vergüenza era más fuerte. Ese no era un campo de exterminio sino de transición, de modo que no fui testigo de las ejecuciones ni de los hornos. Hasta que un guardia, de recorrida por el campo, me encontró curando a un viejo que habían molido a culatazos. Me llevó de los pelos ante el coronel, insultándome todo el camino. El coronel fue terminante. Dijo que esos, los judíos, no importaban; no eran personas. Correrían la suerte que les tocara, según vinieran las órdenes. En cambio yo era una traidora a mi patria y a mi raza, y merecía un castigo ejemplar. Ejecutarme no era una opción, porque la muerte me iba a ahorrar los recuerdos, así que me entregó a un grupo de soldados con órdenes expresas de hacer lo que quisieran conmigo menos matarme. Esto que ves –dijo, apenas rozando las cicatrices– son cortes de bayoneta. Llegan hasta adentro de la vagina. Me perforaron el útero, alternando las violaciones con el manejo salvaje de las bayonetas. No sé cuánto duró, porque me desmayé. Recuperé el sentido en la barraca donde me habían arrojado, un bulto informe de sangre y vómito. Sobreviví gracias a la compasión de otros prisioneros, y perdí noción del tiempo que compartí con ellos hasta que llegó un pelotón aliado. Estoy viva, pero en realidad no lo estoy. Quizá no lo comprendas. Pero ahora sabes.
Extrañamente, lo más doloroso para mí fue la voz sin matices de Margot; la voz que corroboraba su muerte en vida. Me acerqué y le besé aquellas marcas del horror. 

Poco después pedí traslado y jamás la busqué. Mi propia vergüenza erigió una pared infranqueable entre la víctima de sus hermanos y la judía que había creído saberlo todo.

MARTA MERAJVER-KURLAT

viernes, 11 de octubre de 2013

The Nazi women who were every bit as evil as the men: From the mother who shot Jewish children in cold blood to the nurses who gave lethal injections in death camps


  • Chilling new book has unearthered thousands of complicit German women
  • At least half a million witnessed and contributed to Hitler's terror
  • Have been dubbed the ‘primary witnesses of the Holocaust’
  • Secretaries typed the orders to kill and filed the details of massacres
  • Only a small number of women were called to account for their crimes
At the heart of Nazi killings: Irma Grese was a concentration camp guard and one of the few women to be called to account for her crimes
At the heart of Nazi killings: Irma Grese was a concentration camp guard and one of the few women to be called to account for her crimes
Blonde German housewife Erna Petri was returning home after a shopping trip in town when something caught her eye: six small, nearly naked boys huddled in terror by the side of the country road. 
Married to a senior SS officer, the 23-year-old knew instantly who they were. 
They must be the Jews she’d heard about — the ones who’d escaped from a train taking them to an extermination camp.
But she was a mother herself, with two children of her own. So she humanely took the starving, whimpering youngsters home, calmed them down and gave them food to eat.
Then she led the six of them — the youngest aged six, the oldest 12 — into the woods, lined them up on the edge of a pit and shot them methodically one by one with a pistol in the back of the neck.
This schizophrenic combination of warm-hearted mother one minute and cold-blooded killer the next is an enigma and one that — now revealed in a new book based on years of trawling through remote archives — puts a crueller than ever spin on the Third Reich.


Because Erna was by no means an aberration. In a book she tellingly calls ‘Hitler’s Furies’, Holocaust historian Professor Wendy Lower has unearthed the complicity of tens of thousands of German women — many more than previously imagined — in the sort of mass, monstrous, murderous activities that we would like to think the so-called gentler sex were incapable of.
The Holocaust has generally been seen as a crime perpetrated by men. The vast majority of those accused at Nuremberg and other war crimes trials were men. 
The few women ever called to account were notorious concentration camp guards — the likes of Irma Grese and Ilse Koch — whose evil was so extreme they could be explained away as freaks and beasts, not really ‘women’ at all.
Ultra-macho Nazi Germany was a man’s world. The vast majority of women had, on Hitler’s orders, confined their activities to Kinder, Küche, Kirche — children, kitchen and church. Thus, when it came to responsibility for the Holocaust and other evils of the Third Reich, they were off the hook. 
But that, argues Lower, is simplistic nonsense. Women were drawn into the morally bankrupt conspiracy that was Hitler’s Germany as thoroughly as men were — at a lower level, in most cases, when it came to direct action but guilty just the same.

Ironically, it was the professional carers who were the first to be caught in this evil web. From the moment the Nazis came to power and imposed policies of Aryan racial purity, countless nurses, their aprons filled with morphine vials and needles, routinely slaughtered the physically disabled and mentally defective. 
Pauline Kneissler worked at Grafeneck Castle, a euthanasia ‘hospital’ in southern Germany, and toured mental institutions selecting 70 ‘patients’ a day. At the castle they were gassed, which she decided was not that bad because ‘death by gas doesn’t hurt’.


Johanner Altvater, who killed Jews for sport          Liselotte Meier, one of the thousands of Nazi women who were complicit in the crimes of the Third Reich
Complicit: Johanner Altvater (left) and Lisolotte Meirer (right) killed Jews for sport during the Third Reich


Meanwhile, midwives were betraying a whole generation of German women by reporting defects in unborns and newborns and recommending abortions and euthanasia, as well as sterilisation of mothers.
From the outset, Lower concludes, ‘women made cruel life-and-death decisions, eroding moral sensibilities’. A line had been crossed. It was no big step when the racial purification process turned to the Final Solution of exterminating millions of Jews.
That Jews were the enemy and their annihilation the answer was taken for granted by millions of women who would later deny knowing what was going on under their noses.

Lower, though, dubs them ‘primary witnesses of the Holocaust’.
The worst outrages took place in the ‘Wild East’, Hitler’s newly acquired (by military conquest) territories in Poland, Ukraine and other parts of overrun Russia. At least half a million young women joined in this colonisation process, and became accomplices to genocide on an unprecedented scale.
A mass of secretaries, for example, typed the orders to kill and filed the details of massacres. This placed them at the very centre of the Nazi murder machinery, but they, like so many others, chose to shut their eyes and benefit from their proximity to power.
But, picnicking in the country on their days off, how did they miss the mounds that hid mass graves, the gagging smell of rotting corpses? Whose clothes and possessions — plundered from ghettos or confiscated at camps and killing fields — did they think they were cataloguing for redistribution back home?
Trainloads of booty went back to Germany in what Lower calls ‘the biggest campaign of organised robbery in history’. And German women, she charges, were among its prime agents and beneficiaries.
Even more caught up in the criminal madness were administrators such as Liselotte Meier, who worked so closely with her strutting boss, an SS officer, that they were almost indistinguishable. She joined him on shooting parties in the snow, hunting and killing Jews for sport.

In the early phases of the Holocaust, massacres were generally by shooting. In her area of Belarus, she coordinated the arrangements with the executioners and even decided who lived and who died.

She spared the life of the Jewish woman who did her hair, while another secretary removed from a woman from the death line who hadn’t yet finished the sweater she was knitting for her.
Secretaries had another important role, too. After each operation, it was usual for the SS killers, many of them drunk on schnapps, to seek solace in the women’s quarters, whether for sexual release or a shoulder to cry on after the exertions of mass execution.  In support of the men, women even manned refreshment tables during executions so the killers could take a break.
But much worse than these active accomplices were the women who killed — often the wives of SS officers. Erna Petri — callous dispatcher of those six Jewish boys — was one such Frau. She had followed her husband to Poland and lived in a mansion overseeing a vast estate for the Race and Resettlement Office of the SS, with ‘sub-human’ Slavs as slaves.

Another SS wife, Lisel Willhaus, wife of a camp commandant, used to sit on the balcony of their house and take pot shots at Jewish prisoners with her rifle.
Also in Poland was Vera Wohlauf, whose husband Julius commanded a police battalion ordered in 1942 to round up 11,000 Jewish inhabitants of a small town for transportation to Treblinka for liquidation.
She sat by her husband in the front seat of the lorry that led a convoy of killers to the town, and stood in the market square brandishing a whip as nearly a thousand who resisted the round-up or collapsed in the summer heat were beaten to death or shot.
She was pregnant at the time, a further incongruity.
In the Ukraine, 22-year-old secretary Johanna Altvater played an even more prominent role in a massacre while working for regional commissar Wilhelm Westerheide.
During the liquidation of a Jewish ghetto, Fräulein Hanna, as she was known, was seen in her riding breeches prodding men, women and children into a truck ‘like a cattle herder’.


She marched into a building being used as a makeshift hospital and through the children’s ward, eyeing each bed-ridden child. Then she stopped, picked one up, took it to the balcony and threw the child to the pavement three floors below. She did the same with other children. Some died, and even those who survived were seriously injured.
Her speciality — or, as one survivor put it, her ‘nasty habit’ — was killing children. One observer noted that Altvater often lured children with sweets. When they came to her and opened their mouths, she shot them in the mouth with the small pistol that she kept at her side.

On another occasion, she beckoned a toddler over, then grabbed him tightly by the legs and slammed his head against a wall as if she were banging the dust out of a mat.
She threw the lifeless child at the feet of his father, who later testified: ‘Such sadism from a woman I have never seen. I will never forget this.’
Close to the mass-shooting site where the ghetto inhabitants were herded to await their deaths, Westerheide and his deputies partied with some German women. Altvater was among the revellers, drinking and eating at a banqueting table amid the bloodshed.
Music playing in the background mixed with the sound of gunfire. From time to time, one of the Germans would get up, walk to the shooting site, kill a few people and then return to the party.
Violence to children was also the trademark of Gestapo wife and mother Josefine Block, who liked to carry a riding crop and lash out at prisoners waiting to be deported.
A little girl approached her, crying and begging for her life. ‘I will help you!’ Block declared, grabbed the girl by the hair, smashed her with her fists, then pushed her to the ground and stamped on her head until she was dead.
Desperate Jewish parents often approached Block to ask for help, assuming that, as a young woman and mother, she’d be sympathetic.
But she would use her pram to ram Jews whom she encountered on the streets and was said to have actually killed a small Jewish child with it. Such treatment is an affront to any sense of humanity, let alone womanhood — all the more so because most of these crimes went unpunished.
Erna Petri was the exception and spent more than 30 years in prison. But all the others mentioned here were either tried and acquitted or released after questioning.
Their defence was often to play the helpless woman card and blame the men. ‘I was just a secretary,’ pleaded Johanna Altvater. Meanwhile, the millions of other women who were complicit in these odious events got on with their lives after the war as best they could, as if the whole Hitler era had been a nightmare to be put aside and forgotten once everyone had woken up.
Yet the deep stain remains. Thirteen million women were actively engaged in the Nazi Party. Not all of these could have been innocent bystanders. 

Lower says: ‘To assume that violence is not a feminine characteristic and that women are not capable of mass murder has obvious appeal: it allows for hope that at least half the human race will not devour the other, that it will protect children and so safeguard the future.
‘But minimising the violent behaviour of women creates a false shield.’
At least half a million women, she says, witnessed and contributed to the operations and terror of Hitler’s genocidal war. ‘The Nazi regime mobilised a generation of young women who were conditioned to accept violence, to incite it, and to commit it.
‘This fact has been suppressed and denied by the very women who were swept up in the regime and by those who perpetrated the violence with impunity.
‘But genocide is also women’s business. When given the “opportunity”, women too will engage in it, even its bloodiest aspects.’
For those tempted to think that things are different now, consider those shocking photographs earlier this month of a beheading in the Syrian bloodbath.
What was even more gut-wrenching than the gore was to see children looking on, unperturbed, drawn into a terrifying topsy-turvy morality, just as German mothers and children were 80 years ago.
Perhaps, too, the executioner wielding the sword went home to a wife who mopped his brow, in the same way as Hitler’s firing squads did. The lesson of the atrocities of the Holocaust is that they are not something of the past to be filed away and forgotten, but still very much with us.
Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2432620/Hitlers-Furies-The-Nazi-women-bit-evil-men.html

jueves, 10 de octubre de 2013

Enfermeras de día, nazis y asesinas de noche


A pesar de los juicios realizados tras la Segunda Guerra Mundial contra los criminales que ayudaron a cometer el genocidio judío, muchos de ellos consiguieron escapar y evitar su procesamiento. No sólo aquellos que huyeron a otros países y adoptaron nuevas identidades para huir de la justicia. También todos los que tuvieron un papel secundario en el mismo, o que habiendo participado activamente nadie fue capaz de identificar o poner nombre. Especialmente relevante es el caso de las mujeres nazis, ya que pocas de ellas fueron juzgadas, lo que ha hecho que se reste importancia al papel fundamental que pudieron jugar en la ejecución de un gran número de crímenes.
Trece millones de mujeres militaron activamente en el partido nazi, y más de medio millón acudieron a países como Ucrania, Polonia o Bielorrusia excediendo las funciones para las que fueron enviadas, pero ¿tomaron partido en las matanzas a judíos? Eso es lo que se plantea Wendy Lower en Las arpías de Hitler (Editado por Memoria Crítica). Gracias a un arduo trabajo de documentación y búsqueda de datos y testimonios, Lower consigue ofrecer un poco de luz respecto a este tema.
Aunque los juicios a mujeres nazis no fueron especialmente numerosos, Las arpías de Hitler recuerda que muchos de los supervivientes del Holocausto identificaron a las personas que los acosaron, violaron y torturaron como señoras alemanas que nunca pudieron encontrar al desconocer sus nombres. Además, los estudios realizados posteriormente han advertido que el genocidio no habría sido posible sin una amplia colaboración de la sociedad. ¿Quiénes fueron esas mujeres que ensuciaron sus manos con la sangre de los prisioneros?
Maestras, enfermeras, secretarias y esposas
La creencia más extendida es que las únicas que cometieron crímenes fueron las guardianas de los campos de concentración, mientras que el resto tuvo un papel secundario en la historia del nazismo. Sin embargo la realidad es bien distinta. Cuando los alemanes avanzaron hacia el este, medio millón de mujeres les acompañaron y alcanzaron un poder sin precedentes que les dio libertad para hacer con los prisioneros lo que quisieran. Maestras, enfermeras, secretarias y esposas, esas eran las funciones que originariamente tendrían que realizar todas aquellas que acudían junto al ejército. Finalmente, muchas de ellas decidieron, voluntariamente, colaborar directamente con las SS.
Miembros de la Liga de Muchachas Alemanas disparando como parte de su entrenamiento (1936)Miembros de la Liga de Muchachas Alemanas disparando como parte de su entrenamiento (1936)
Las arpías de Hitler incide constantemente en un dato fundamental: ninguna de las mujeres que describe tenían la obligación de matar. Negarse a asesinar judíos no les habría acarreado ningún castigo. Es más, el régimen no formaba a las mujeres para convertirse en asesinas, sino en cómplices. Por tanto, las que finalmente decidieron realizar dichos crímenes lo hicieron o por satisfacción personal o por obtener un beneficio de aquellas acciones.

De hecho, las primeras matanzas cometidas por los nazis las protagonizaron las enfermeras de los hospitales, que exterminaron a miles de niños por desnutrición, o incluso con inyecciones letales, aunque la mayoría de ellas nunca pagaron por sus delitos.
Es el caso de Pauline Kneissler, cuya tarea consistía en portar una lista de pacientes que posteriormente debían ser matados. En un solo año (1940) el equipo en el que trabajaba Kneissler en Grafeneck asesinó a 9.389 personas. Ella fue testigo directo de cómo los gaseaban y prestó su ayuda a la hora de administrar la inyección letal a muchos pacientes durante cinco años. Pauline fue una de las mujeres que, posteriormente, se trasladó al este para continuar con su ola de crímenes.
Sin embargo, allí no fueron las enfermeras las que cometieron los asesinatos más sádicos, sino las secretarias y las esposas de los miembros del partido nazi. Entre las primeras destaca el nombre de Johanna Altvater, que desarrollaba su puesto en Minden, Westfalia, antes de ser trasladada a Ucrania. Allí, en 1942, Altvater comenzó su descenso a los infiernos, llegando incluso a asesinar a un niño judío de dos años golpeando su cabeza contra un muro para arrojarlo sin vida a los pies de su padre. Este posteriormente llegó a declarar que nunca había visto tal sadismo en una mujer, una imagen que nunca pudo borrar de su mente.
Crímenes ante seres indefensos, prisioneros, mujeres e incluso niños. La mujer nazi tampoco tuvo piedad, como no la tenían sus compañeros masculinos. Aprendieron bien la lección de qué era lo que había que hacer y no dudaron ni un solo momento. Así le ocurrió a Erna Kürbs Petri, hija y esposa de granjero que junto a su marido Horst (miembro de las SS) se encargaba de dirigir una finca agrícola. Un día, Erna Petri vislumbró algo cerca de la estación de Saschkow. Cuando su carruaje se acercó se dio cuenta de que eran varios niños judíos escondidos que habían conseguido huir.
Mitin del Partido Nazi en Berlín (Agosto de 1935)








Petri les pidió que se acercaran y los llevó a su casa. Allí les dio de comer y los tranquilizó. Pero todo esto sólo fue parte de su siniestro plan. Al ver que su marido no regresaba a casa, ella decidió terminar el trabajo que él habría  hecho. Llevó a los niños hasta una fosa donde ya se había asesinado antes y los colocó en línea, dándoles la espalda. Cogió la pistola que su padre le había regalado y uno a uno los fue matando a sangre fría. Ni siquiera los gritos desconsolados de los que vieron cómo caía el primero ablandaron el corazón de Erna.
Estos son sólo tres de los muchos casos que Wendy Lower presenta en Las arpías de Hitler. Relatos que encogen el corazón y muestran hasta dónde es capaz de llegar el ser humano. Como la propia autora dice al finalizar su libro, nunca sabremos todo sobre el nazismo y el Holocausto, esto es sólo una historia más en un puzle con infinitas piezas de crueldad.
Fuente: http://www.elconfidencial.com/cultura/2013-10-07/enfermeras-de-dia-nazis-y-asesinas-de-noche_37151/